Grantown 250

Grantown 250  is now an annual celebration of a fantastic Highland town with a unique history and a vibrant community.  It showcases the history and attractions of this unique community as well as the wider Highlands. The Grantown 250 festivals at the end of June highlight  seven key themes: Heritage, Environment, Sport and Culture, Music, Trade, Tourism, Food and Drink. The whole project is designed to provide a significant boost for Grantown’s fragile economy and leave a lasting legacy for the town.

After the ’45 – Dawn of the Modern Highlands

This painting of Sir James and Lady Grant, painted by David Allan in 1785, shows, on the table, a plan of the proposed new town.

This painting of Sir James and Lady Grant, painted by David Allan in 1785, shows, on the table, a plan of the proposed new town.

Grantown is an attractive, eighteenth century, planned town in the very heart of the Highlands, capital of Strathspey and the Northern Gateway to the Cairngorms National Park.

It is the best documented and one of the “best preserved and most interesting” of all the 500 or so planned towns and villages in Scotland. Grantown’s story gives a unique insight into the massive changes in Highland life in the second half of the eighteenth century.

It was on the 28th June 1765 that John Grant, a weaver from Rothiemurchus, watched the laying of the first stone of his new linen manufactory. It was built along the front of lot 10 on the north side of the Square.

The builder was William Anderson, a master mason from Portsoy. It was the first of several new buildings in James Grant of Grant’s new town – New Grantown.